Archive for November, 2011

Punctuation

Posted in Uncategorized with tags , on November 26, 2011 by johnbuckley100

A break between the Top Five and Bottom Five in the Tulip Frenzy 2011 Top Ten List.

Leica M9, 21mm Summilux.

Tulip Frenzy’s #6 Best Album Of 2011: A.A. Bondy’s “Believers”

Posted in Music with tags , on November 26, 2011 by johnbuckley100

So incongruous is the description of what A.A. Bondy produced on the magnificent Believers — an album that owes equal debts to Tom Petty, Ryan Adams, and Brian Eno — it’s hard to convey what a fine accomplishment this is.  Beautiful singing, a glorious sounding record — with the sonic space of British art-rock undergirding classic American folk and roots rock — this was the sleeper album of the year.  We did not see this coming, not from a guy who in the 1990s fronted a Nirvana-esque punk band.

Tulip Frenzy’s #7 Best Album of 2011: Wilco’s “The Whole Love”

Posted in Music with tags , on November 26, 2011 by johnbuckley100

Ambitious, but not to a fault, comforting yet still with an edge, America’s finest band explored new ground on The Whole Love even while producing a work on the continuum stretching back to A Ghost Is Born. Jeff Tweedy dissed the dissers in advance of the album’s release, mocking those purists who, no matter what Wilco now does would go, “Meh.”  The fact remains that Wilco, in the kind of groove the Stones hit with Sticky Fingers, have had a run of great albums, and while Wilco, The Album gave us pause, the moment we heard “The Art of Almost,” and then “Born Alone,” we knew it wasn’t over.

Tulip Frenzy’s #8 Best Album of 2011: Jesse Sykes & The Sweet Hereafter’s “Marble Son”

Posted in Uncategorized with tags , on November 26, 2011 by johnbuckley100

With a voice we compared to the Good Witch, and a guitarist with more tricks than the Wizard of Oz, Jesse Sykes &  The Sweet Hereafter’s Marble Son was the strangest album we’ve ever been unable to get off our playlist.  Phil Wandscher’s tasteful, artful pickings struck a chord, if you will, as it took time til we learned Whiskytown’s great guitarist was backing a singer with so odd a vocal aspect singing genuinely powerful tunes, at which point it all came clear. If not a pure psychedelic band, as some claimed, a record that brought both Whiskeytown and the Quicksilver Messenger Service to mind was a welcome addition to our iPod.

Tulip Frenzy’s #9 Album of 2011: Tinariwen’s “Tassili”

Posted in Uncategorized with tags , on November 26, 2011 by johnbuckley100

In releasing Tasilli, Tinariwen did something remarkable: it seamlessly melded its Saharan response to the Delta Blues with musicians from Wilco, TV On The Radio, and the Dirty Dozen Blues Band.  We compared it to the Columbian Exchange, the cross fertilization between worlds old and new, seeds and spores crossing the Atlantic in both directions.  Somehow it was fitting that Touareg musicians who once had Gaddafi as a benefactor would release a great album just as Tripoli was liberated. While we missed the Clarksville, Mississippi ragas of their early albums, the women and kids singing around the fire, this was a fine album deserving of the acclaim it received.

Tulip Frenzy’s #10 Album of 2011: Wye Oak’s “Civilian”

Posted in Music with tags , on November 26, 2011 by johnbuckley100

When Wye Oak’s Civilian was released early in the year, we wrote that it was “a band so ambitious that it’s produced its (first) masterpiece while there are still no more than five rings around its arboreal trunk.”  An album as delicate as early Eno, as powerful as Sonic Youth, Civilian disproved the rule that two-person bands suffer from limitations.  Of course, it helps that Andy Stack plays the Centaur’s game — half drummer, half bass player — and that Jenn Wasner sings and strums like a one-woman army.  Civilian may have been demilitarized, but it packed a delicate wallop.

Thanksgiving Morn

Posted in Uncategorized with tags , on November 25, 2011 by johnbuckley100

Leica M9, Noctilux 0.95

%d bloggers like this: