Archive for Luna

The Lost Glove Is Happy

Posted in Uncategorized with tags , , , , , , on October 5, 2012 by johnbuckley100

For much of the past week, we have been thinking about synchronicity.  No, not the Police album.  More like the theory outlined in Arthur Koestler’s The Roots Of Coincidence, which described causally unrelated events occurring.

This flows from the following: last Saturday, while traveling, we began reading Pale Fire for the first time since college… for the first time, come to think of it, since we read Koestler… and we chuckled when Nabokov’s gloriously unreliable narrator Charles Kinbote relates a proverb from the mythical country of Zembla, that goes, “The lost glove is happy.”  Kind of struck a chord, but we chalked it up to having read the book so long ago.

And then on Monday, for some strange reason, we played Luna’s great 2003 album Rendezvous, whose first song is “Love Dust.”  And about three verses in, Dean Wareham sings:

I’m bad with faces

And worse with names

But the lost glove is happy

It’s all the same

And we about launched from our driver’s seat.  What are the odds of that?  Haven’t played “Love Dust” in a year or more…

Rare Footage Of Luna Playing “23 Minutes In Brussels” From 1995

Posted in Music with tags , , , on March 11, 2012 by johnbuckley100

From Dean Wareham/Galaxie 500/Luna fan site A Head Full Of Wishes comes this fun video of Luna playing “23 Minutes In Brussels” from 1995.  Stanley is still the drummer, Sean still has long hair, and the band sounds good.

Dean Wareham Is Preparing To Record A Solo Album

Posted in Music with tags , , , on January 17, 2012 by johnbuckley100

In a brief and illuminating interview that was published last week, ex-Luna leader Dean Wareham outlines plans for a solo album.  Yes, Britta will be on it, so there’s no news there.  He just avers the boy-girl song-trading has limitations.

Oh, and by the way, his tour diary from the recent Japanese shows he did of Galaxie 500 material was published in the Paris Review.

Here’s a sample:

From the stage tonight I notice three different people crying as I sing “Blue Thunder,” which is a song about the power-steering action in my old 1975 Dodge Dart and doesn’t quite seem worth crying about, though admittedly it is also a song about being alone behind the wheel, and I wail about driving “so far away,” so maybe that’s what did it.

I recently played this song in São Paulo and young Brazilians sang and smiled and danced; it’s odd that the same song evokes smiles in São Paulo and tears in Tokyo. Of course there can be joy and sadness in a song at the same moment, and when you have been waiting five or ten or twenty years to hear a song live, it can hit you with surprising force.

Read the whole thing.  It’s fun, and as we know from Black Postcards, the man can write.

 

Dean Wareham’s “Black Postcards” Reads Like A Song By Luna

Posted in Music, Uncategorized with tags , , , on April 18, 2008 by johnbuckley100

There’s not going to be a Luna reunion anytime soon — not now that Dean Wareham has written a funny, candid, rock’n’roll memoir about life in two of indy rock’s greatest bands: Galaxie 500 and Luna. Luna’s other guitarist Sean Eden will likely not forgive him for the portrait Wareham paints, and in fact future collaborators would be well advised to watch their step when working with Dean; he’s not just a gloriously tasteful guitar god, he’s also a really amusing reporter whose now written one of the great chronicles on life in a band that, while providing pleasure to its fans for a decade or more, never quite got to the verge.

When Luna’s final album, “Rendezvous,” came out in 2004, it seemed like Wareham had nothing much left to say.  At least nothing much left to sing: the songs were sonically gorgeous, and his guitar playing was casually perfect; he’s such a naturally gifted musician, he barely had to strain to showcase his chops. But the lyrics at the end consisted of couplets like, “She’s got a rosy future/in her Juicy Couture.” Thankfully, “Black Postcards” shows the Dalton School and Harvard-educated Wareham still capable of writing funny, snarky prose.  In fact, it’s written in exactly the voice we’d expect of Wareham, only with more bite.

This should be required reading for aspiring rockers.  For the one or two bands each year who become big enough to travel in style, there are dozens who bump around the countryside in the backs of cramped vans, hungover and with a crick in their neck, trying to find the next venue.  Luna, who recorded some great albums but never had a hit, were one of the ones touring for life support while the music industry crashed and burned around them.

Here’s Wareham on the dichotomy between being a critical success with Galaxie 500 and having to take a day job to pay the rent: “Sure, I had my photo on the front of the Arts and Leisure section, but I was also broke.  I found a temp job at Italian Vogue magazine, just for the holiday season.  I was one of two administrative assistants in a small office in the Conde Nast building.  The other secretary, a Puerto Rican lady, laughed at me.  ‘You’re in a band? Your band must not be so popular, or you wouldn’t be working here.”

He’s got wonderful insights, harbored and husbanded over years in which he kept good notes.  From why bands break up — mostly because the enforced camaraderie of life on the road makes them so get on each others’ nerves– to why the best drummers tend to come from the suburbs — houses in the suburbs have basements in which you can make a racket.  It’s a wise and entertaining read even if you weren’t a Luna fan (though it helps.)

I was a Luna fan.  A major one.  I saw them a dozen or more times over the years.  For years, “Penthouse” was my favorite album and their live shows were the way we punctuated the calendar.  I once went to a party in my Washington neighborhood where a woman who was identified by her husband as the best friend of Dean Wareham’s wife, told the story about her getting a phone call from her friend.  Wareham’s wife had confided that Dean was having an affair with Britta Phillips, the strikingly attractive bass player who had recently joined the band.  “She said she’d given him an ultimatum: break up the band, or end the marriage.”  

“Omigod,” I blurted out.  “I hope he ends the marriage.”

My wife hit me.  Really hard.

By the end — and I saw Luna’s last D.C. show, a few weeks before they packed it in — the song “Black Postcard”, written at least three years previously, had acquired an elegiac finality. “I’m tired of having no future, and I’m tired of pushing my luck, and I’m tired of waiting for the endgame, watching the stars go black/Throw it all away, throw it all away/I want a holiday.”

It was time.  Thankfully Wareham kept writing down contemporaneous observations, and proved himself as skillful with a keyboard as he is with a fretboard.

 

The Duke Spirit’s Oasis Amidst The Desert That Is British Rock

Posted in Music with tags , , , on February 18, 2008 by johnbuckley100

This is a message to the management of The Duke Spirit: okay, you know you have under contract the single strongest British rock band to emerge since Oasis in 1994.  Liela Moss’s vocals are sexier than Kate Moss’s face, and the band packs such a wallop that that once it hammers its hooks into your brain, you’re pinned, completely caught, no place to go but to replay their music over and over and over again.  At the same time, guitarists Luke Ford and Dan Higgins can play Buzzcocks rough to Luna soft, and all stops in between.  But here’s your challenge as management: you have to resist licensing their music to a car company. Oh yeah, they’re coming, if they haven’t already got there.  The band’s perhaps a little too hard rock for Volkswagen, but I can easily see Mitsubishi going for the Zombies-like intro to “The Step and the Walk” from the superb new album “Neptune.”  I’m guessing Ford or Dodge might want to show how hip they are by having “Lassoo” power an ad for some jet black SUV, cruising with the club kids through lower Manhattan.  And here’s my advice: resist.  Sure, the songs are catchy enough for such commercial application, yet at its heart — the Duke Spirit’s spirit, if you will — the band needs to channel Sterling Morrison riffs and Noel Gallagher power chords on the way to making maybe the strongest Brit rock of the modern age. Yeah, they’re that good. Anything else is a sellout.  Don’t blow it.

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